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Wendell George | Little Joe discovers language can be confusing

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Little Joe’s heart synchronized with the ancient two beats per second rhythm of the ceremonial drums. His vision swirled in ever descending spirals as he relaxed and felt his worries dissolve. The incoming frequencies exploded into vivid colors uncovering a long-sought memory. Other recognized patterns gradually emerged into his awareness. Even with minimum input and analysis, the meaning became clear to him. He sensed this was the survival instinct of his ancestors: his Spirit Power (Sumach) in action.

His uncle (Twasen) believed this power could change anything for the better. Little Joe entered the required alpha state (9 to 14 cycles per second brain waves) by slowly breathing in and out while concentrating on just one thing, like spirals.

“Uncle, why don’t we use ESP (extra sensory perception) like our ancestors? It seems to be a more accurate way of communicating.”

“ESP was all our ancestors had until new techniques overshadowed it. We still use it with our pets. ESP is untainted coded frequencies that we transmit and receive. But people wanted more than just a feeling so they created symbols to interpret. That evolved into speech. Now we don’t have faith in our feelings because the left brain dominates awareness. It cuts off the right brain’s ability to generalize and perceive.

Most languages are organized in terms of cause and effect instead of relationship. It prevents thinking “outside the box” for which the mythical Coyote (Semyow) is famous. Coyote stories demonstrate the well-developed sense of humor of most tribal people. Humor cuts across normal reasoning with new insight, i.e. walk a mile in their moccasins before you criticize someone; then you are a mile away and have their moccasins.

Our lives have many events affecting each other simultaneously, not subject acting on object like a sentence. For example, ancient Greeks would say “The light flashed!” But the light and flash are one. The Hopi would more accurately say “Reh-pi!” meaning “Flash!”

“What does it mean when we speak from the heart?”

“Little Joe, scientists call the right hemisphere of the brain the limbic circuit or the heart-brain. It is the source of intuitive thinking. Facts and events are instinctively perceived and understood without step-by-step reasoning. It just feels right (or wrong).”

“But emotions can carry you in many directions.”

“True, Little Joe. But science has discovered the right side of the brain “tunes” information and the left “fits” it. The left matches new experiences to past experiences. The right hemisphere identifies the unknown with minimum input.”

“What about the English language?”

“English is a rich language that is excellent for description but poor for perception. It is a passive information system that uses words and symbols according to the rules of mathematics, grammar and logic. The language becomes rigid, making it difficult to deal with present-day reality.”

“So, Uncle, language can be constructed with words, symbols, or frequencies but accuracy varies with the individual. And as population grows the meaning becomes fuzzy because of different backgrounds and history.”

“Right, and also because perceptions and values are not necessarily the same. Perception is only the ‘truth’ of individual belief systems. But music transcends that hurdle when frequencies resonate and memories are pleasantly provoked.”

Wendell George can be reached via email at wvegeorge@charter.net. His books are available at the local book stores, museums and Amazon.com.

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