The Wenatchee World

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The latest extended forecast from The Weather Channel

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Hydrologic Outlook issued February 13 at 2:55PM PST until February 14 at 10:00AM PST by NWS

...MILD, WET, AND BREEZY CONDITIONS MAY LEAD TO STREAM RISES... AN UNSETTLED WEATHER PATTERN WILL CONTINUE THROUGH THE WEEKEND AND INTO EARLY NEXT WEEK. EXPECT RISING SNOW LEVELS AND MILD TEMPERATURES LEADING TO MELTING OF THE MID AND LOW ELEVATION SNOW. THE SNOW MELT IN COMBINATION WITH RAIN MAY LEAD TO RISES ON MANY OF THE AREA`S STREAMS. TEMPERATURES ON MONDAY...TUESDAY AND

Tonight

Lo33° Rain Likely and Patchy Fog

Sunday

Hi47° Patchy Fog then Cloudy

Sunday Night

Lo39° Mostly Cloudy

Washington's Birthday

Hi56° Partly Sunny

Monday Night

Lo41° Mostly Cloudy

Tuesday

Hi54° Partly Sunny

Tuesday Night

Lo40° Mostly Cloudy

Wednesday

Hi47° Chance Showers

Wednesday Night

Lo38° Chance Rain

Thursday

Hi46° Slight Chance Showers

Yes, and yes again

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Two more ballot measures not to be overlooked:HJR 4220: Washington’s constitution states specifically that anyone accused of a crime is entitled to bail, unless charged with aggravated first-degree murder and possibly subject to the death penalty. Judges, when faced with a defendant they believe might be a danger to the public, often set bail so high that it is very unlikely to be met. But, sometimes, it is. The case of Maurice Clemmons is one example. He had a violent history and faced multiple felony counts, but was released after friends put up $8,000 and offered a house as backing for a $190,000 bond. Clemmons was free to gun down four Lakewood Police officers in a coffee shop. This constitutional amendment that would expand the bail exception to those accused of crimes punishable by life in prison. A judge could set bail or deny it if clear and convincing evidence suggests a defendant might be dangerous. It could apply to about 1,000 cases a year statewide, but is likely to be used infrequently. It is similar to the rule used in federal court.

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