The Wenatchee World

Weather:

Weather

The latest extended forecast from The Weather Channel

Remove this weather forecast

Today

Hi63° Mostly Sunny

Tonight

Lo48° Rain Likely

Wednesday

Hi55° Rain

Wednesday Night

Lo46° Rain

Thursday

Hi61° Slight Chc Showers

Thursday Night

Lo45° Slight Chc Showers

Friday

Hi54° Chance Rain

Friday Night

Lo48° Rain Likely

Saturday

Hi60° Chance Rain

Saturday Night

Lo44° Slight Chc Rain

That day is nearly here again

Next Saturday morning a carpool of the willing, volunteers and Rotarians, will set out from the Grace Lutheran Church parking lot on their way to the Methow Valley, to face the scars of the horrible Carlton Complex fires and do what they can to help.

Yes on I-594

Background checks are a sensible precaution when selling firearms. They are no cure for gun violence and mayhem, and no threat to the rights of legitimate gun owners, but it is possible they might keep some guns out of unwanted hands, namely away from convicted criminals and people with a certified mental illness. That in some degree is a boost for public safety.

Quincy hospital needs a yes vote

This will be Quincy Valley Medical Center’s year of decision. The hospital lost $800,000 last year, managers say. It owes nearly $4 million to Grant County and the county treasurer says if the debt is not reduced he’ll recommend the commissioners approve no more hospital expenditures. Comes that reckoning, and Quincy Valley Medical Center would have to cut services so severely it essentially will cease to be.

Editorial | No on I-1351

Initiative 1351 on the current ballot is an irresponsible, self-serving, budget bashing measure that exploits a soft spot with voters while hiding the enormous, untenable price they will be forced to pay. Worse, the research suggests all that expense and sacrifice will bring little or no improvement in the education of their children. Nothing.

Keep Ebola in perspective, OK?

I do not worry about Ebola. It all looks scary with those poor people dying in Africa and all the horrible suffering, but I do not worry about it. The experts in communicable disease tell us that everything’s fine, that my chance of contracting Ebola is less than being stuck by lightning three times during my lunch break Friday. You can’t catch it except when an infected person shows symptoms, like fever, and even then you only get it through contact with their contaminated bodily fluids, like blood and vomit ...

Just enforce the laws equitably

It’s a simple story, really. Police ignore laws they otherwise enforce, and the unprivileged public reacts unfavorably.

Cooperation in a true calamity

It was an exceptionally beautiful autumn day on our stretch of the Columbia Friday. The river just kept rolling along at 76,000 cubic feet per second. On shore, orchardists and workers were busy harvesting the last of a record apple crop. Coho and chinook salmon were still arriving by the hundreds, adding to the more than 786,000 salmon that had passed Rock Island since spring. Boaters were enjoying the fine weather. Appreciative people strolled on the shoreline trails. All was right with the world.

Fusion, cheap: Keep on trying

Sorting through the electronic press releases Thursday, I spied this headline: “UW fusion reactor concept could be cheaper than coal.”

Columbus, snubbed again

Monday is Indigenous Peoples Day in Seattle. The Seattle City Council has voted to celebrate on the second Monday of October the former inhabitants of the shores of what European descendents called Elliott Bay, which lies on a body of water named for a British naval officer, in a city whose name is a rather awkward anglo-phoneticization of a 19th century Duwamish leader’s name, which some say might be better spelled Si’ahl, for a more accurate pronunciation.

Court chills out on gay marriage

Relax. It turns out there really wasn’t much to worry about. People of the same sex can marry legally, and take on the contractual and social obligations that go with it, and there are only a few dissipating ripples in the fabric of the moral universe. People who once worried about a generation-long social war as the traditional concept of marriage was challenged, now wonder what the big deal is. People who feared creative judges would force gay marriage on a wary public, now realize it is the public that ...

The long struggle

The scope of the disaster called the Carlton Complex is still too great for an ordinary detached person to grasp. It happened mostly one horrible night in July — 320 homes destroyed, hundreds of outbuildings lost, countless assets and livestock gone and hundreds of people displaced. Gov. Jay Inslee’s office estimated the value of lost homes alone at $28 million, and secondary losses at $70 milllion. Mind you, this is in one valley in the corner of a huge county with 15,000 households total, and a median household income of ...

A big-time event takes our ice

If you think major sporting events with national implications do not occur in Wenatchee, you are wrong. A very major sporting event with hundreds of athletes is happening in this very city, now. It does not involve throwing balls or hitting things with sticks. It requires superb athletic ability, years of practice and dedication, and sharp skates.

A college at 75

It was not so long ago that 51 individuals in the Depression-ravaged community called Wenatchee gathered to pool their resources and form an educational institution that would become Wenatchee Valley College. This coming Saturday, Oct. 11, marks the official beginning of a year-long celebration of their foresight, and the success of the institution. Yes, Wenatchee Valley College is 75 years old.

We could march for energy reality

There is nothing wrong with 400,000 people driving or flying to New York to denounce oil companies, political cronies and assorted corporate henchmen for insincere commitment to fighting climate change. I watched with nostalgic fascination. It gets your ’60s blood running. I couldn’t help wondering, though, how they all got there.

The hills won’t be the same

There may be a better natural setting for a musical, maybe “South Pacific” on Fiji or “Oklahoma!” in a corn field that smells of cow, but for sheer atmosphere it’s hard to beat an early summer night at the Leavenworth Ski Hill for “The Sound of Music.” You sit in a clearing in the woods, the setting sun glowing off the surrounding peaks, then suddenly the music swells, the spotlight hits up the slope and a joyful young woman in alpine dress emerges to sing, “The hills are alive ...