The Wenatchee World

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Columbus, snubbed again

Monday is Indigenous Peoples Day in Seattle. The Seattle City Council has voted to celebrate on the second Monday of October the former inhabitants of the shores of what European descendents called Elliott Bay, which lies on a body of water named for a British naval officer, in a city whose name is a rather awkward anglo-phoneticization of a 19th century Duwamish leader’s name, which some say might be better spelled Si’ahl, for a more accurate pronunciation.

Court chills out on gay marriage

Relax. It turns out there really wasn’t much to worry about. People of the same sex can marry legally, and take on the contractual and social obligations that go with it, and there are only a few dissipating ripples in the fabric of the moral universe. People who once worried about a generation-long social war as the traditional concept of marriage was challenged, now wonder what the big deal is. People who feared creative judges would force gay marriage on a wary public, now realize it is the public that ...

The long struggle

The scope of the disaster called the Carlton Complex is still too great for an ordinary detached person to grasp. It happened mostly one horrible night in July — 320 homes destroyed, hundreds of outbuildings lost, countless assets and livestock gone and hundreds of people displaced. Gov. Jay Inslee’s office estimated the value of lost homes alone at $28 million, and secondary losses at $70 milllion. Mind you, this is in one valley in the corner of a huge county with 15,000 households total, and a median household income of ...

A big-time event takes our ice

If you think major sporting events with national implications do not occur in Wenatchee, you are wrong. A very major sporting event with hundreds of athletes is happening in this very city, now. It does not involve throwing balls or hitting things with sticks. It requires superb athletic ability, years of practice and dedication, and sharp skates.

A college at 75

It was not so long ago that 51 individuals in the Depression-ravaged community called Wenatchee gathered to pool their resources and form an educational institution that would become Wenatchee Valley College. This coming Saturday, Oct. 11, marks the official beginning of a year-long celebration of their foresight, and the success of the institution. Yes, Wenatchee Valley College is 75 years old.

We could march for energy reality

There is nothing wrong with 400,000 people driving or flying to New York to denounce oil companies, political cronies and assorted corporate henchmen for insincere commitment to fighting climate change. I watched with nostalgic fascination. It gets your ’60s blood running. I couldn’t help wondering, though, how they all got there.

The hills won’t be the same

There may be a better natural setting for a musical, maybe “South Pacific” on Fiji or “Oklahoma!” in a corn field that smells of cow, but for sheer atmosphere it’s hard to beat an early summer night at the Leavenworth Ski Hill for “The Sound of Music.” You sit in a clearing in the woods, the setting sun glowing off the surrounding peaks, then suddenly the music swells, the spotlight hits up the slope and a joyful young woman in alpine dress emerges to sing, “The hills are alive ...

OK, figure out how to pay for it

They said it would be free. Or, maybe it wouldn’t be free exactly, but surely just a painless reshoveling of the extra billions piled around Olympia at the time. It was called the Washington School Class Size Act, or Initiative 728, presented to the sympathetic voters of Washington on the 2000 ballot. The ballot title said, “Shall school districts reduce class sizes, extend learning programs, expand teacher training, and construct facilities, funded by lottery proceeds, existing property taxes, and budget reserves?”

Common Ground | “Walk to End Alzheimer’s set for Oct. 11

Bob Le Roy and Justine Stevens-McClure of the Alzheimer’s Association stopped by the office with Diane Tribble of Aging and Adult Care of Central Washington Tuesday to talk about the upcoming “Walk to End Alzheimer’s.”

Names they choose

It was with great interest we read that the 12 Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation are considering dropping the labels imposed upon them, and returning to, well, their real names. It has always been a little puzzling, to them and to us, how groups of indigenous peoples can come to be called by a name they never knew, communicated in a Roman alphabet they never used, which couldn’t begin to represent the correct inflection of their native language. The Wenatchee tribe, for instance, never called itself the Wenatchee tribe ...

Sense, efficiency are the real goals

We have made the point many times: This is one region. We are not divided by geography, custom or culture. We, for lack of a better name the Greater Wenatchee Area, have been splintered into a conglomeration of rival municipalities by history and political circumstance. We pay every day for the inefficiencies that brings about.

Picture wilderness

No photographs please, unless you pay $1,500 for a permit, and perhaps convince us your motives are acceptable. So has said the U.S. Forest Service to would-be commercial photographers who wished to capture images in a wilderness area. That may sound insane, but there it is in a proposed rule already temporarily in force and due to be finalized before year’s end. After predictable outrage Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell backpedaled Thursday, assuring all the rule was meant only for commercial photo shoots and movie crews, not newspaper or television ...

Speeders with nowhere to hide

There is a dismal inevitability to the automated enforcement of traffic laws. It’s happening, more is coming, and if the technology in its current infant state makes some of us uncomfortable, at least we are being conditioned to a future where traffic laws can be enforced always, every second of the day, no exceptions.